Exercise of the Week

September 15, 2011
Exercise of the Week: Squat with Lateral Raise-Start by standing on the tube with
both feet and cross the tubing in front. Begin the squatting motion with weight in heels
and knees stacked over the ankles. Once this movement has been mastered, add in
the lateral raise with the tubing.
CUES:
  • Keep core engaged throughout by pulling belly button to spine
  • Squeeze the glutes at the top of the squat while keeping the knees soft
  • Keep the shoulders away from the ears
  • Only lift the arms as high as you can, you don’t have to come up to the shoulders
  • BREATHE
MODIFICATIONS:
  • To lessen the intensity, perform the exercise without the tube/resistance.
 Click Here to watch a video of this exercise!
The Prenatal “Why” of his ExerciseThis exercise is great for a prenatal woman because it strengthens the upper and lower body. The multi-tasking this exercise demonstrates creates a stronger mom for when baby comes home.
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Exercise of the Week

September 8, 2011
Exercise of the Week: Plank with Crunch Into 3 Legged Dog –Begin in a plank position and draw one knee in towards to opposite shoulder. Progress into a 3 legged dog by extending the leg upwards. Return to plank and begin again on the other side.
CLICK HEREto watch a video of this exercise!
 
 
CUES:
  • Brace the entire core before the movement happens.
  • Draw the knee very close to the opposite shoulder
  • Slow the movement down and make each part focused and intense
  • The goal in the 3 legged dog is to create a straight line from the extended leg and the torso
  • B R E A T H E
MODIFICATIONS:
  • For less intensity, take out either the crunch or the hip extension  
The Prenatal “Why” of This Exercise-There is a great deal of core strengthening taking place in this movement which aids in possibly alleviating muscle fatigue and pain in pregnancy. As her pregnancy progresses, the diagonal crunch will need to be taken out as belly will be in the way.

Exercise of the Week

September 1, 2011
Exercise of the Week: Stroller Sit Up-Sit in front of your stroller with the front wheel between your feet. With feet flat on the ground and knees bent, lower to the ground. Keep hands behind the head and engage the abdominals to contract into a sit up. Be sure to tickle baby at the top!
CUES:
  • Keep core engaged throughout by pulling belly button to spine
  • Relax your neck and jaw
  • BREATHE
MODIFICATIONS:
  • To lessen the intensity, don’t come all the way up in the sit up and make it a “crunch”
Click Here to watch a video of this exercise!
The Prenatal “Why” of This Exercise: Strengthening the core is crucial to help combat the postural changes which happen throughout pregnancy, especially lordosis. If she is in her 2nd or 3rd trimester, make sure that she doesn’t come all the down onto her back.

American Heart Association’s take on childhood INACTIVITY

July 21, 2011
Boys and girls playing soccer in a park AHA Scientific PositionPhysical inactivity is a major risk factor for developing coronary artery disease. It also increases the risk of stroke and such other major cardiovascular risk factors as obesity, high blood pressure, low HDL (“good”) cholesterol and diabetes. The American Heart Association recommends that children and adolescents participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day.

Why is exercise or physical activity important for my child?

Increased physical activity has been associated with an increased life expectancy and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease.  Physical activity produces overall physical, psychological and social benefits. Inactive children are likely to become inactive adults. And physical activity helps with

  • controlling weight
  • reducing blood pressure
  • raising HDL (“good”) cholesterol
  • reducing the risk of diabetes and some kinds of cancer
  • improved psychological well-being, including gaining more self-confidence and higher self-esteem

How do I promote physical activity in my child?

  • Physical activity should be increased by reducing sedentary time (e.g., watching television, playing computer video games or talking on the phone).
  • Physical activity should be fun for children and adolescents.
  • Parents should try to be role models for active lifestyles and provide children with opportunities for increased physical activity.

What if my child is uncoordinated or overweight?

All children, even less-coordinated ones, need to be physically active.  Activity may be particularly helpful for the physical and psychological well-being of children with a weight problem.

The American Heart Association recommends:

  • All children age 2 and older should participate in at least 60 minutes of enjoyable, moderate-intensity physical activities every day that are developmentally appropriate and varied.
  • If your child or children don’t have a full 60-minute activity break each day, try to provide at least two 30-minute periods or four 15-minute periods in which they can engage in vigorous activities appropriate to their age, gender and stage of physical and emotional development.

Exercise of the Week

July 4, 2011
Exercise of the Week: Diagonal Stroller Lunge-Stand in front of your stroller and baby, leading with your outside leg, begin a lunge to the side of the front wheel. Push back to a standing position and lunge with the other leg. This simple and effective exercise is even better when baby interaction is involved! Play with tempo and patterns, as well.
CUES:
  • Keep core engaged throughout by pulling belly button to spine
  • Shoulder blades in your back pockets
  • At the lowest point of the lunge, keep knee over ankles…not toes
  • Pivot back foot slightly to protect knee when changing sides
  • BREATHE
MODIFICATIONS:
  • To lessen the intensity, don’t go as deep into the lunge.
Click Here to watch a video of this exercise!
The Prenatal “Why” of This ExerciseWhen baby comes home, the new mom will need lower body strength for all the getting up and getting down she will be doing in order to feed and care for her newborn.

Exercise of the Week

May 17, 2011
Exercise of the Week: Plie with Shoulder Extension-Stand in front on your stroller and get into a plie position; feet out wide and toes pointing out. Hold the handles of the tube and choke up on it to create resistance between both hands. Begin into a plie squat, making sure the knees stay over the ankles (not the toes) at the lowest point of the squat. Add in the lateral shoulder extension at the bottom of the squat. Don’t forget smiles for baby!
Click Here to watch a video of this exercise!
CUES:
  • Keep core engaged throughout by pulling belly button to spine
  • Choose the level that is right for you today
  • Keep weight in the heels and knee over ankles…not toes.
  • As you press the arms out, imagine the movement like a punch.
  • BREATHE
MODIFICATIONS:
  • To lessen the intensity, perform without the tube and make the plie a little more shallow.
The Prenatal “Why” of This ExerciseThis exercise is great for pregnant moms as it targets both upper and lower body!. The deltoids specifically are truly functional muscles for all the lifting and carrying she will be doing as a new mom.

Exercise of the Week

April 5, 2011
Exercise of the Week: Supine Leg Circles-Start in a supine
position (on your back) with leg straight up from the hip joint and
feet together. Begin making a circle with the feet, getting wider
and wider with time. Repeat in the other direction.
Click Here to watch a video of this exercise!
CUES:
  • Keep core engaged throughout by pulling belly button to spine
  • Slight bend in the knees
  • BREATHE
MODIFICATIONS:
  • If low back pain occurs, make the circles smaller.
The Prenatal “Why” of his Exercise : This exercise is great for
a prenatal woman in her first trimester. After week 12, replace this
exercise with incline bicycles on the elbows. Be sure the pregnant
mom continues to strengthen her abdominals throughout pregnancy.